What’s the WOD?

WOD is “Workout of the Day.” We will have a new workout programmed for each day.

Some insight and thoughts on sets and reps:

  • The WOD descriptions are very literal; don’t read into them. If it says “squats” it means bodyweight (aka “air squats”) – no added weight, unless it says back squats or front squats.
  • A “rep” or repetition is one iteration of a movement. One bench press, one squat. A “set” is a group of reps: 10 reps =10 bench presses, 10 squats. 3 sets is do a group of repetitions, rest, repeat, rest, repeat. So, 3 sets of 10 (reps) is 10/rest/10/rest/10. The rest interval is up to your recovery time, and the goal of the WOD. Obviously, if it’s a timed WOD, you want to rest less.
  • Also, rest and reps are frequently inverse. Sometimes a WOD says deadlift 3-2-2-1-1-1. This means a set of 3 reps, a set of 2 reps, another set of 2, a “set of one” aka a “single.” This few reps indicates maximal load, and indicates longer rest times.
  • Back to literal: if the WOD says 21-15-9 reps of bench and pullups in “rounds” (or any two or three exercises as given) you do 21 reps of exercise 1, followed by 21 reps of exercise 2, and 21 reps of exercise 3 if there is a third one. Now do 15 of the first, 15 of the second…9 of the first, 9 of the second.
  • Most likely you will be breaking the 21’s and 15’s (and maybe the 9’s) into subsets, aka “breakdowns.” This is based on your strength and conditioning. Remember if you need to adjust the weight downward, do so, since these are timed WODs.

 

Do I need to be in shape to come in?

ABSOLUTLY NOT! We hear this question a lot. You don’t need to do anything before you decide to show up. All we ask is you come in with a good attitude and work hard.

 

What do I need to bring?

We provide all the equipment you will need for the workout. Common personal items you may want to consider purchasing are Olympic weightlifting shoes, cable speed jump rope and athletic tape.

 

What if I can’t do the Rx weight?

The Rx weight sets the standard weight for experienced athletes.  Use a weight that’s manageable to you, or use a percentage of the weight prescribed.   Never let your ego get in the way here.  We all want to lift more weight but realize it takes time and practice practice practice to do the Rx weights on a regular basis.

 

Is the WOD enough? Should I do more?

Part of the crossfit philosophy includes pursuing/learning another sport or activity, and many crossfitters are also martial artists and competitive athletes in a variety of disciplines.
However, if you work the WODs hard, you will find yourself at an improved level of fitness, and for lots of us, the WOD is our primary “sport.”
If you pursue another activity, you will need to balance your work/rest cycles and be sure to allow for recovery.

 

What’s a Pood?

Russian measure used for kettlebells; common ones: 1 pood =36 lbs; 1.5 pood = 54 lbs; 2 pood = 72 lbs. Approximate dumbbell equivalents are 35, 55, 70

 

What’s a Tabata Set?

For twenty seconds do as many reps of the assigned exercise as you can – then rest 10 seconds.
Repeat this seven more times for a total of 8 intervals, 4 minutes total exercise.
The score is the least number of reps for any of the eight intervals.

 

Are there descriptions of exercises in the WODs?

Go Here for videos of the common CrossFit exercises.

 

CrossFit Acronyms and Abbreviations

  • AMRAP: As Many Reps (sometimes Rounds)as Possible
  • BP: Bench press
  • BS: Back squat
  • BW (or BWT): Body weight
  • CFT: CrossFit Total – consisting of max squat, press, and deadlift.
  • CLN: Clean
  • C&J: Clean and jerk
  • C2: Concept II rowing machine
  • DL: Deadlift
  • FS: Front squat
  • GHR(D): Glute ham raise (developer). Posterior chain exercise, like a back extension. Also, the device that allows for the proper performance of a GHR.
  • GHR(D) Situp: Situp done on the GHR(D) bench.
  • GPP: General physical preparedness, aka “fitness.”
  • HSPU: Hand stand push up.
  • HSQ: Hang squat (clean or snatch). Start with bar “at the hang,” about knee height. Initiate pull. As the bar rises drop into a full squat and catch the bar in the racked position. From there, rise to a standing position
  • IF: Intermittent Fasting
  • KB: Kettlebell
  • KTE: Knees to elbows. Similar to TTBs described below.
  • MetCon: Metabolic Conditioning workout
  • MP: Military press
  • MU: Muscle ups. Hanging from rings you do a combination pull-up and dip so you end in an upright support.
  • OHS: Overhead squat. Full-depth squat performed while arms are locked out in a wide grip press position above (and usually behind) the head.
  • PC: Power clean
  • Pd: Pood, weight measure for kettlebells
  • PR: Personal record
  • PP: Push press
  • PSN: Power snatch
  • PU: Pull-ups, possibly push ups depending on the context
  • Rep: Repetition. One performance of an exercise.
  • Rx’d; as Rx’d: As prescribed; as written. WOD done without any adjustments.
  • RM: Repetition maximum. Your 1RM is your max lift for one rep. Your 10 RM is the most you can lift 10 times.
  • SDHP: Sumo deadlift high pull
  • Set: A number of repetitions. e.g., 3 sets of 10 reps, often seen as 3×10, means do 10 reps, rest, repeat, rest, repeat.
  • SPP: Specific physical preparedness, aka skill training.
  • SN: Snatch
  • SQ: Squat
  • Subbed: Substituted. TheCORRECT use of “subbed,” as in “substituted,” is, “I subbed an exercise I can do for one I can’t,” For example, if you can’t do HSPU, you subbed regular pushups.
  • TGU: Turkish get-up
  • TTB: Toes to bar. Hang from bar. Bending only at waist raise your toes to touch the bar, slowly lower them and repeat.
  • WO, sometimes W/O: Workout
  • WOD: Workout of the day
  • YBF: You’ll Be Fine (liberally applied in spray form)